These are the currently scheduled classes for AWMAC 2019. Please keep checking back as we add to our teaching schedule over the coming months.

Times for these classes can be found in the draft schedule for AWMAC 2019.

Bâton à deux bouts and Bastone, historical solo form exercises

Instructor: Graeme Anderson, Independent Researcher
Weapons covered: chin height to quarterstaff length staves
Equipment requirements: a broomstick or halfstaff / quarterstaff, ordinary protective equipment for dry drills optional, some sticks provided.
Required Experience: Beginner to Advanced students

A selection of solo and dry training exercises used for the Bâton à deux bouts or Bastone staff, with similarities to the Montante and Spadone exercises.

Please note this class is being offered over two sessions.

Bolognese Polearms – an introduction

Instructor: Richard Cullinan, Stoccata Drummoyne
Weapons covered:  partisan, ronca, speido and javelin
Equipment requirements:  Mask, gloves (padded gloves recommended, pole / staff of around 2.4 – 2.7 m (some loaners will be available.)
Required Experience: Beginner students

The treatises of Antonio Manciolino (Opera Nova, 1531) and Achille Marozzo (Opera Nova, 1536) both provide detailed instruction on the use of polearms such as partisan, ronca, speido and javelin. These weapons are all taught using a common framework with small variations in their use due to the different polearm heads. This class will focus on the common actions for all polearms, with some brief exploration of how the differing polearm types may be used.

English broadsword system of Zach Wylde – 1711

Instructor: Matthew Boyd, Stoccata Launceston
Weapons covered: English broadsword / backsword
Equipment requirements: Mask, gloves, broadsword or backsword, sabre with shell guard.
Required Experience: Beginner students

Zach Wylde published his treatise The English Master of Defence in 1711. He may be considered one of the last of the renaissance writers of the science of defence as he seeks to round the student out with a variety of weapons and skills, namely smallsword, broadsword, quarterstaff and wrestling.

The broadsword class will examine the stances, guards, drills and footwork of Wylde’s system then apply these to his concepts of true and false play.

English Quarterstaff system of Zach Wylde – 1711

Instructor: Matthew Boyd, Stoccata Launceston
Weapons covered: Quarterstaff
Equipment requirements: Mask, gloves, staff 6′-8′ with 7′ being standard
Required Experience: Beginner students

Zach Wylde published his treatise The English Master of Defence in 1711. He may be considered one of the last of the renaissance writers of the science of defence as he seeks to round the student out with a variety of weapons and skills, namely smallsword, broadsword, quarterstaff and wrestling.

The quarterstaff class builds on Wylde’s broadsword teaching (attendance at the broadsword class isn’t essential). Wylde states that the quarterstaff is a true British weapon and once understood you may laugh and bid defiance to any other weapon. This class looks at applying Wylde’s footwork, guards and techniques to both half-staff and quarterstaff defence.

Highland Broadsword and Targe

Instructor: Paul Wagner, Stoccata School of Defence
Weapons covered: Broadsword and Targe
Equipment requirements: Mask, A sword (ideally a broadsword, by any single-handed sword will do), and a targe (numerous spares are available if you don’t own one)
Required Experience: Beginner to Advanced students

The targe was a small round wooden shield, used in conjunction with the Highland Broadsword by Gaelic warriors from the 16th to the 18th century. The techniques are recorded in a series of plays in Thomas Page’s Use of the Broad Sword, plus a little additional material in McBane and contemporary iconography. This was a military system, designed to be played under the pressure of battlefield conditions where the luxury of “keeping distance” and duelling was not available.

This class will introduce students to the basic plays of the targe, with particular reference to the conditions of use.

Italian Rapier & Dagger

Instructor: Richard Cullinan, Stoccata Drummoyne
Weapons covered: rapier & dagger
Equipment requirements: rapier, dagger, mask, gloves, fencing jacket
Required Experience: Intermediate, students should ideally be familiar with Italian single rapier fencing, or a thrust orientated sword system.

The rapier and dagger has become synonymous with Italian fencing of the 17th Century. Masters such as Giganti, Capoferro, and Fabris all provided us with detailed instructions on how to use this weapon combination. In this class we’ll be concentrating on the use of the dagger to control our opponent’s sword, particularly focusing on the use of stesso tempo responses.

Provoke, Deceive and Succeed!

Instructor: Mark Holgate, Adelaide Sword Academy
Weapons covered: Single sword and Longsword
Equipment requirements: Single handed sword, Longsword, fencing mask, gloves
Required Experience: Basic competency with either longsword or single sword

What’s the best way to strike your opponent? Hit them where they are not expecting it! This workshop will teach you to provoke, deceive and mislead your opponent, and to protect yourself from being bamboozled. We will be exploring these techniques with both longswords and single handers.

P.S. Clowning may occur. 😉

Now Witness the Power of this Fully Armed and Operational Buckler!

Instructor: Paul Wagner, Stoccata School of Defence
Weapons covered: Sword & Buckler
Equipment requirements: Mask, and swords
Required Experience: Beginner to Advanced students

During the 16th century, the English Buckler underwent a rather dramatic change in design. John Stowe wrote “And whereas untill about the twelfe or thirteenth yeere of Queene Elizabeth, the auncient English fight, of Sworde, and Buckler, was only had in use, the Bucklers then beeing but a foote broad, with a pike of 4. or 5. Inches long, then they beganne to make them full half ell broad, with sharp pikes 10. or 12. Inches long, where with they ment eyther to breake the swordes of their enemies, it if hitte uppon the pike, or els sodainely to runne within them and stabbe, and thrust their Buckler with the pike, into the Face, arme, or Body of their adversay;…every haberdasher then sold Bucklers.”

This change in buckler size and shape was necessary to accommodate the basket-hilted backsword, but had a profound effect on the way the buckler was held and wielded. This class will explore the Elizabethan Sword and Buckler fight, from the days of classic “Swashbuckling” when “all the high streetes, were much annoyed and troubled with hourely frayes, of sword and buckler men, who tooke pleasure in that bragging fight; and although they made great shew of much furie, and fought often. Yet seldome any man hurt….”

Strette di Meza Spada – Grappling with swords

Instructor: Gindi Wauchope, The School of Historical Fencing
Weapons covered: Single Sword, Two handed sword
Equipment requirements: A sword (preferably a basket hilt, but any single sword will do) A buckler (preferably large, but any buckler will do) A fencing mask
Required Experience: Beginner to Advanced students

Crossing swords middle to middle is a dangerous and exciting place to play. This class will explore the strategies for success when death by thrust is on the line and nothing short of dumping your opponent to the earth will satisfy. The primary sources used are those of Achille Marozzo (Two handed sword), and Giovanni dall’Agocchie (single sword).